AIIS Announces its 2021-22 Fellowship Recipients

The American Institute of Indian Studies is Pleased to Announce that the Following Scholars have been Awarded Fellowships to Carry Out their Projects in India in 2021-22:

Grants for Follow-Up Projects for Participants in the AIIS/CAORC faculty development seminars in India:

Nabil Ouassini, assistant professor in the College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology at Prairie View A & M University for the project “Slums and Law Enforcement in India.”

Maria del Carmen Paniagua, associate professor of Mathematics, Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington, for the project “Deconstructing Sustainability and Poverty Indices.”

Amarjeet Sawhney, professor of Architecture, Building Construction and Interior Design at Miami-Dade College and Jessica Barnes, senior lecturer in the Department of Geography, Planning and Recreation at Northern Arizona University for the project “Planning for social sustainability in Indian cities: Lessons in identifying and designing spaces of co-presence and community.”

Scott Walker, professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability at Northwest Vista College for the project “Deep Mapping the Upper Reaches of the Yamuna River, Delhi’s Water Supply”

The Faculty Development Follow-Up awards are funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC). The grant recipients will be carrying out their projects in India in the summer of 2021. Participants in the faculty development seminars are faculty members at community colleges and minority-serving institutions.

AIIS Fellowship Awardees:

Pritika Agarwal, a graduate student in the Department of Dance at Temple University, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out her project, “Performing Nomadism, Transnationalism and Heritage: Kalbeliya Dance On and Off Screen.” Ms Agarwal is the recipient of the Thomas W. Simons Fellowship.

Aditi Aggarwal, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out her project, “Pragmatics, Politics and Planning: Examining Train Vendors’ Gendered Networks and Marginalization in Mumbai’s Economic Futures.” Ms Aggarwal is the recipient of the Rajendra Vora Fellowship for the Study of Society and Culture in Maharashtra and the Vina Sanyal Research Award.

Emilia Bachrach, an assistant professor in the Department of Religion at Oberlin College, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out her project, “Gender and Ascetism in Contemporary Gujarat.” Professor Bachrach’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC).

Meghaa Ballakrishnen, a graduate student in the Department of History of Art at Johns Hopkins University, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out her project, “The Labor of Painting: Tyeb Mehta, Nasreen Mohammedi and Arpita Singh (1968-1979).” Ms Ballakrishnen is the recipient of the Asher Family Fellowship.

Srimati Basu, a professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Kentucky, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out her project, “Investigating the Indian Woman Detective. Professor Basu’s fellowship is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Sohini Chattopadhyay, a graduate student in the Department of History at Columbia University, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out her project, “Death and Destitution in a City: Bombay and Calcutta Between 1896 and 1960.” Ms Chattopadhyay is the recipient of the Kumkum Chatterjee Memorial Fellowship in Indian History.

Swati Chattopadhyay, a professor in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at the University of California, Santa Barbara, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out her project, “Mapping the Ephemeral: Architecture and Civic Community in Kolkata’s Durga Puja.”

Madhuri Deshmukh, a professor in the Department of English at Oakton Community College, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out her project, “The Poet and the Grind-Mill: Janabai and the Making of Marathi Literature.” Professor Deshmukh’s fellowship is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Rodney Benedito Ferrao, an assistant professor in the Department of English at the College of William and Mary, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out his project, “Continents in the Archive: The Untold Story of Violet Dias Lannoy.” Professor Ferrao’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

Sourav Ghosh, a graduate student in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out his project, “Muddle in the Middle? Sovereignty and State Formation in Eighteenth Century India.” Mr. Ghosh is the recipient of the Metcalf Fellowship in Indian History.

Sugandh Gupta, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out her project, “Dependency, De-Addiction and Relations of Care in Jammu.” Ms Gupta is the recipient of the Joseph W. Elder Fellowship in the Social Sciences.

William Hofmann, an independent scholar, was awarded a performing and creative arts fellowship to carry out his project, “Singing Sufi Texts: Early Hindi Sufi Poetry and the Performance of an Indo-Persian Music.” Dr. Hofmann’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

Leela Khanna, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at New York University, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out her project, “Naturalizing Hindutva: Studying a New Generation of Hindu Nationalist Women.” Ms Khanna is the recipient of the Joe Elder College Year in India Junior Fellowship. Ms Khanna’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

Kripanand Komanapalli, a graduate student in the Department of Religion at Columbia University, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out his project, “Returning Elsewhere: Twentieth Century Dalit Religion, Migration and Identity.” Mr. Komanapalli is the recipient of the Daniel H.H. Ingalls Memorial Fellowship.

Paul Livingstone, a musician, composer and instructor in the Department of Music at Glendale Community College, was awarded a performing and creative arts fellowship to carry out his project, “Tradition, Synthesis & Innovation: Dagar Bani Dhrupad Bass.”

Michele Louro, an associate professor in the Department of History at Salem State University, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out her project, “Conspiracy in Interwar India: The Meerut Trial and its Aftermath, 1929-1934.” Professor Louro’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

C. Townsend Middleton, an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out his project, “Quinine’s Remains: An Anthropological History of Quinine in India.” Professor Middleton’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

Janaki Phillips, a graduate student in the Department of Sociocultural Anthropology at the University of Michigan, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out her project, “The Everyday and its Afterlife: Interactions with Spirits in North Indian Hill Stations.” Ms Phillips is the recipient of the Rachel F. and Scott McDermott Fellowship. Ms Phillips’ fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

Brittany Puller, a graduate student in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Michigan, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out her project, “On the Basis of Biradari: Community and Kinship in Eighteenth Century Punjab.” Ms Puller is the recipient of the Thomas R. Trautmann Fellowship. Ms Puller’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

Jay Sharma, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at Syracuse University, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out his project, “Rethinking Subaltern Politics: Memories, Spiritual Beings and Law.”

Sonal Sharma, a graduate student in the Department of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out his project, “Paid Domestic Labor and the Labor Question in Post-Colonial India.”

Sudev Sheth, a senior lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Pennsylvania, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out his project, “Python in the Archive: Computational Data Mining and Visualization of Historical Records from Mughal India.” Professor Sheth’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

Eric Steinschneider, an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at Ithaca College, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out his project, “Women, Reading and Vedanta in Contemporary South Asia.” Professor Steinschneider’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.

Sheba Tejani, an assistant professor in the Julien J. Studley Program in International Affairs, New School University, was awarded a senior fellowship to carry out her project, “Building a Hindu Nation: The Case of Gujarat.” Professor Tejani’s fellowship is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Kyle Trembley, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Washington, was awarded a junior fellowship to carry out his project, “Rattus Hierarchicus: Rats, Caste, Gender, and Care in Rajasthan.” Mr. Trembley’s fellowship is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) through CAORC.